Visual Arts

The Bronze Sculptures Of Bruno Catalano Are Not All There

 

French artist Bruno Catalano has created an extraordinary series of eye-catching bronze sculptures called “Les Voyageurs” in Marseilles that depict realistic human workers with large parts of their bodies missing.

The sculptures were put on display in Marseilles to celebrate its position as the 2013 European Capital of Culture. They are skillful works of art even without the omissions, but the missing parts of the sculptures make them truly extraordinary and unique. They leave room for the imagination – are they missing something, or is it something that these “voyagers” have simply left behind? What’s especially impressive is that some of the sculptures seem to stand on very little support, giving them a sort of ethereal and surreal appearance.

Only ten of the life-size sculptures were presented at the port of Marseilles – many more can be seen on his website.

Found on: Bored Panda, My Modern Met

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Painting with Light

Some artists paint with a brush on canvas, but artist Janne Parviainen is a little bit different. To create his magical portraits, the Helsinki-based artist chooses to paint with light without using any digital post-processing. He sets up very long camera exposures and develops his drawings by moving different lights in specific patterns within the camera frame. As a result of his movements, spirals of light form mysterious figures that emerge out of the darkness.















Found on: My Modern Met

Monsieur Qui New Street Pieces – Paris, France

Eric Lacan aka Monsieur Qui is a street artist and illustrator hailing from France with a broad range of work; from street art to fashion illustrations.
The Parisian artist, most known for his paste-ups of pretty ladies, has an elegance to his style which is seldom seen on the streets.

Several New Street Art Pieces By French Artist Monsieur Qui On The Streets Of Paris, France. 2
Several New Street Art Pieces By French Artist Monsieur Qui On The Streets Of Paris, France. 3Several New Street Art Pieces By French Artist Monsieur Qui On The Streets Of Paris, France. 4
Found on: Street Art News

New Chain Link Sculptures by Young-Deok Seo

Korean sculptor Young-Deok Seo has crafted several new chain link sculptures—two for his Anguishseries of a man in despair and one of a peaceful woman for his Nirvana series. Continuing to work with the unconventional medium of choice, Seo maintains his high skill level of recreating the human form and projecting a sense of emotion through it. Like many of the figurative sculptures in the artist’s growing collection, this latest additions offers an expressive pose that is easy to translate, despite their fragmented nature.

Found on: My Modern Met

Puddle-Shaped Mirrors Look Just Like Water

 

This incredibly realistic, rippling installation, entitled Mizukagami (Water Mirror), was created by Japanese art director and designer Rikako Nagashima in collaboration with designer Hideto Hyoudou. The true to life forms are actually made out of acrylic and were installed by the two artists throughout a small room. Dripping down the sides of a table or along the surface of a wall, the amorphous shapes formed the illusion of liquid in the most unexpected places.

Found on: My Modern Met

 

Street Art that Makes You Look Twice


Mark Jenkins
 has taken his interesting and unusual art in which he uses duct tape and polyethylene to create human sculptures that he places in random public street settings. He records the reaction of the people to his work as he enjoys the psychological impact that his work has on others.

Visual artist is the master of inspiring a sense of shock, wonder and curiosity from general members of the public. He placing his ‘human’ sculptures and other objects in various locations throughout Europe, often in the most random of situations. But all of them public and in high density areas. People casually going about their daily routine, only to confronted with the alarming, peculiar and surreal. Mark then photographs the individuals as they work past his art, capturing their reactions and wildly different expressions.

Many of them wondering would surely be wondering, is it real or is it art? Either way, his work is thought-provoking, slightly unnerving and even whimsical at times. If you were walking past and saw his work, how do you think you’d react to it?

View more of his curious experiments right here

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Street Artworks That Will Cause You To Look Twice By Mark Jenkins

Found on: So Bad So Good

Translucent Wave Paintings from the 19th Century

The late 19th century Armenian-Russian painter Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky created some truly spectacular paintings of seascapes that capture the beautiful, shimmering essence of the tumultuous waters. The marine artist gained recognition for his impeccable ability to recreate the expressive quality of oceans with over half of his 6,000+ paintings from his lifetime being devoted to the subject.

What separates Aivazovsky’s seascape paintings from others is his ability to replicate both the intensity and motion as well as the translucency and texture. His energetic waves and calm ripples are equally effective. Aivazovsky also plays with colors, simulating the effects of sunlight filtering through the waters to present an ethereal quality that imitates a sort of magical realism. There’s something absolutely stunning about the painter’s ability to skillfully emulate the emotional connection to the coastal scenes that translates centuries later.








Found on: My Modern Met

Photos That Look Unbelievably Like Paintings

While we’ve all seen our fair share of hyperrealistic and photorealistic art, or paintings and sculptures that look amazingly like photographs, it’s not too often that we come across photos that look like paintings. Throughout the five-plus years we’ve been around, we’ve seen these unbelievable photos pop up here and there and today, we decided to give them all one home. Here, then, are ten fascinating photos that look unbelievably like an oil, acrylic or watercolor painting. Enjoy!

Found on: My Modern Met

Digital Structures Created By Human Movement

1 Human Movement Converted Into Digital Sculptures

When the fluid movements of dance are transformed into digital sculptures, the results are mesmerizing. JL Design TV with the help of KORB has made a documentary for CCTV Documentary Channel that follows the organic beauty and emotion of dance and turns it into solid materials like steel, wood, and glass. Seeing the trails of each gesture frozen in time is incredible.

SEE ALSO DANCERS AMONG US: PHOTOGRAPHS INSPIRE US TO APPRECIATE EACH MOMENT

KORB explains the video:

Idents visualize four different themes. To emphasize the emotion of each Ident, we have decided to use different textures of steel, wood and glass. Motion sculpture of steel reflects old Chinese adage that true power is mastering yourself. Youthful energy of dancers evolve into beautiful organic sculpture. Colorful happiness is the engine of father’s and his daughter’s joy. Two lovers visualize fragility and vitality of love in the last Ident.

See more videos from KORB on their Vimeo Channel.

2 Human Movement Converted Into Digital Sculptures

Via: Visual News

Realistic 3D Street Painting

Street painting, also known as pavement art, street art and sidewalk art, is thought to have originated in Britain, and in 1890 it was estimated that more than 500 artists were making a full-time living from pavement art in London alone. The origins of 3d pavement art is attributed to Kurt Wenner who started to practice this 3d style, also known as anamorphic art, in the 1980s.

Today there are many 3d street artists, but only a handful of truly outstanding ones, and here we are featuring the work of  brilliant 3d street artists. Of course, street painting is along the same lines as street art (alternatively known as Grafitti), the main difference being that street painting is done on the ground and street art is usually applied to a vertical surface, such as a wall.

 

 

 

via: OneXtraPixel