China

Submerged City Found under a Lake in China

China’s Qiandao Lake has a hidden a secret… An underwater city! The ancient city of Shi Cheng can be found in the province of Zhejiang and has been submerged underwater for 53 years. The reason for the cities drowning is due to the fact that the Chinese Government needed a hydroelectric power station built and the city was situated smack bang in the middle of the proposed man made lake.






Found on: My Modern Met

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China’s Olympic Venue Transformed into a Waterpark Wonderland

For the 2008 Beijing Olympics China built The Beijing National Aquatic Center aka The Water Cube. Running costs for the upkeep of the arena are over $10m, so the government needed to figure out how to offset the costs.

Desgin firm Forrec Ltd from Toronto stepped in to help, and this is what they came up with…

Underwater Theme Park at The Beijing National Aquatic Center

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 2

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 3

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 5

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 6

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 7

Water Cube The Beijing National Aquatic Center 8

Found on: So Bad So Good

Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the World’s Longest Wooden Sculpture

Chinese artist Zheng Chunhui recently unveiled this exceptionally large wooden sculpture that measures some 40 feet (12.286) meters long. Four years in the making, the tree carving is based on a famous painting called “Along the River During the Qingming Festival,” which is a historical holiday reserved to celebrate past ancestors that falls on the 104th day after the winter solstice. On November 14th the Guinness World Records arrived in Fuzhou, Fujian Province where the piece is currently on display to declare it the longest continuous wooden sculpture in the world. You can see many more photos over on China News

Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the Worlds Longest Wooden Sculpture  wood trees sculpture
Photo by Lv Ming

 

Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the Worlds Longest Wooden Sculpture  wood trees sculpture
Photo by Lv Ming

 

Sculptor Zheng Chunhui Spent 4 Years Carving the Worlds Longest Wooden Sculpture  wood trees sculpture
Photo by Lv Ming

Found on: Colossal

Deserted Paris of the East

On any given day in Paris, you might see hundreds of thousands of  residents and tourists in the streets. They go in and out of shops, snap pictures next to landmarks, stare in wonder at the opulent architecture. But over 5500 miles away, there is another Paris – a comparative ghost town where the streets stand nearly empty.

Construction on Tianducheng, in China’s Zhejiang district, began in 2007. It was meant to be a luxurious gated community resembling Paris in every way possible. The highlight of the town is its 354-foot replica of the Eiffel tower, but plenty of Paris’ other landmarks have been faithfully recreated here.

There is a major incongruity between one’s expectations for a “little Paris” and what you will actually see in Tianducheng. The streets are, for the most part, entirely empty. There are no throngs of tourists or business people rushing off to their offices. There is a lot of quiet, and there is a fair amount of traditional Chinese culture, seemingly completely out of place in the French surroundings.

agricultural chinese life outside paris replica

The development was built to house 100,000 people and to draw rural families into a bustling metropolitan area. As of 2007, (the last time the population was counted), only 2,000 souls inhabited the gated compound. The population seems to be dwindling, leading local media to refer to Tianducheng as a “ghost town.”

It may seem odd to build a replica of a famous city in a different country, but the developers were working on the idea that Paris was seen as a romantic destination. They felt that Chinese people would want to live in this faux-European environment with its stately townhouses and wide-open courtyards. Several other Western-style towns and communities have been built in China around this idea.

At least in Tianducheng, you are more likely to see empty streets and traditional Chinese agricultural life than the distinctly Parisian pastimes of shopping, strolling, and sipping wine on a restaurant patio. Daily life in the town is documented in the video above.

worker in tianducheng

Work is still in progress in the compound; its expected completion date is in 2015. So the Paris of the East, it turns out, isn’t quite a ghost town – it hasn’t had the time to develop ghosts just yet. In a few years, this now-quiet development could very well be chock full of Chinese residents ready to begin their European-style lives.

Found on: WebUrbanist

10 Heartbreaking Photos

They say a photo speaks a thousand words, so with the greatest respect to these heartbreaking moments from our history & the photographers that have shared them with the world, we’ll let these images do the talking….

1. Remembrance

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
A Russian war veteran kneels beside the tank he spent the war in. It’s now used as a monument. Source

2. Peace

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
An unknown monk prays for an elderly man who had died suddenly while waiting for a train in Shanxi Taiyuan, ChinaSource: Asianewsphoto / Reuters

3. Grief

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
This is ‘Leao’ at the time this photo was taken, she had sat for the 2nd consecutive day at the grave of her owner who perished in the landslides in Brazil January 15 2011. Source: Vanderlei Almeida / Getty Images

4. Loss

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
In the background a North Korean man waves his hand as a South Korean relative weeps. Just 436 South Koreans were allowed to spend 3 days in North Korea to meet their 97 North Korean relatives. The two countries have kept them separate since the 1950-53 war. Source: Kim Ho-Young / Reuters

5. Death

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
A wounded soldier sinks to his knees, a the result of sniper fire in Venezuela. Navy chaplain Luis Padillo gives him his last rites. Source

6. Fear

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
An unknown French civilian cries in fear as Nazis storm France to occupy Paris during World War IISource

7. Cruelty

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
Nazi military commander Heinrich Himmler inspects the concentration camps only to be confronted by Prisoner of War Horace Greasley. Greasley would regularly escape from the camp and then sneak back in. Allegedly managed this over 200 times. His reason? He was meeting a local German girl in secret, with whom he’d fallen deeply in love with. Source

8. Kindness

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
An exhausted firefighter catches his breath, sharing his water bottle with a dehydrated koala in Victoria, AustraliaSource: Mark Pardew / Reuters

9. Resolve

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
During tenth anniversary of the 9/11, Robert Peraza takes a solitary moment to remember the loss of his son at the World Trade Center memorialSource: Justin Lane-Pool / Getty Images

10. Love

11 Photographs That Might Just Reduce You To Tears
After many years, a German World War II prisoner was finally released by the Soviet Union. This photo sees him being reunited with his daughter. She’d not seen her father since she was one year old.

Colorful Rock Formations in China

We are living in times when Photoshop is capable of practically anything, but this time it has nothing to do with this article! Zhangye Danxia Landform in China is just one of thoseplaces that are hard to believe really exist. Located in Gansu province, a naturally formed landscape astonishes its visitors with the burst of colors – its streaks of yellow, orange and red to emerald, green and blue make it hard to believe it’s all real. The vast area of intensely colored valleys, waterfalls and natural pillars looks surreal in the pictures, reminding more of a impressionistic painting than a photograph.

Formed from red-colored sandstones and conglomerates, Danxia landform is a unique example of petrographic geomorphology. The name actually refers to various different landscapes in southeast and southwest China, that formed due to special nature’s conditions, such as water flow fissures, erosion, oxidization and tectonic plate movements. The formation process of Zhangye geopark took over 24 million years, dating back to the Cretaceous age.

Today the Danxia landform is a huge tourist attraction, with six of its landscapes inscribed onto the UNESCO World Heritage Site list in 2010. If you plan on visiting it, hope for the rain, as the vibrant hills glow even brighter after rainfall!

Image credits: Melinda Chan

Image credits: Huffington Post

Image credits: Amos Chapple

Image credits: Xin Ran

Image credits: Xin Ran

Image credits: Xin Ran

Image credits: laboiteverte.fr

Image credits: laboiteverte.fr

Image credits: Melinda Chan

Image credits: Mohsin A. Soomro

Images credits: Melinda Chan

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