Amazing Treehouses From Around The World

As kids, most of us have dreamed of having a tree house as a safe haven – a secret place where we could establish a top-secret club house away from our pesky parents. Some of us still do. Interestingly, people in some countries don’t see tree houses as exotic, but as every-day parts of their lives. In New Guinea, for example, the Korowai people live in tree houses permanently. The raised homes help protect their food and belongings from animals and floods by keeping everything above ground level.

Luckily, the tree house has become more than just a fairy tale-like hideout or an exotic living place in far-away lands. For those who seek to realize some of their greatest childhood dreams and are looking for a unique way to recharge and relax, architects and designers now offer some unbelievable tree houses and hotels for holidays. These have long outgrown the tradition wooden cabin concept, featuring multiple floors or even glass and mirror elements.

Three Story Treehouse (British Columbia, Canada)

Why have a single-story tree house, if you can have three? This one is said to be the tallest tree house in British Columbia, Canada. You can find it somewhere near Revelstoke

The Bird’s Nest Tree House (Sweden)

This tree house, by the creators of the Tree Hotel, might confuse the birds even more. Although it looks like a massive nest from the outside, the house has a modern and high-standard room built inside

The HemLoft Treehouse (Whistler, Canada)

After retiring at the age of 26, software developer Joel Allen became a carpenter and fulfilled his dream of “building something cool”. Kind of an understatement. He never thought this personal project would be featured in international design magazines

Minister’s Treehouse (Crossville, Tennessee, USA)

This grandiose 100-foot-tall structure is said to be the tallest tree house in world, and was built entirely out of reclaimed wood by Horace Burgess in Crossville, Tennessee.

Plane Treehouse (Costa Rica)

While not entirely a treehouse, this vintage Boeing 727 was originally bought by Joanne Ussary for $2,000.00. It cost her $4,000.00 to move the plane and $24,000.00 to renovate an turn it into this Executive Suite 727 tree house. A jacuzzi in the cockpit is just one of the intriguing ideas she had for her new home

Teahouse Tetsu (Yamanashi, Japan)

Architect Terunobu Fujimori‘s treehouse combines both minimalism and fantasy. While the interior is simple and modern, the exterior looks like a page from a fairy tale

 

via: Bored Panda

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